Some national parks won’t recover from the government shutdown for decades

death valley national park

Joshua Tree and other deserts house sensitive soil crust communities.

Photos of felled Joshua trees went viral last week, a casualty of the government shutdown and the related lack of oversight in the eponymous national park. Other arid…

Popular Photography

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AMD Radeon VII release date, news and features

The whole computing world has been waiting with bated breath for AMD’s high-end graphics card – and it’s finally here. Although it’s not the Vega II launch that seemed all but certain, the Radeon VII looks like a stunner that may even beat the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080.

Featuring a whopping 16GB of video memory and a high boost clock of 1,800MHz, this looks like a very exciting graphics card from Team Red. Hang with us for a bit as we tell you everything you need to know about the AMD Radeon VII.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? AMD’s latest high-end graphics card
  • When is it out? February 7, 2019 
  • What will it cost? $ 699 (about £550, AU$ 980)

AMD Radeon VII

AMD Radeon VII release date

While we don’t report on production numbers externally,” the statement reads, “we will have products available via AIB partners and AMD.com at launch of Feb. 7, and we expect Radeon VII supply to meet demand from gamers.

AMD to Overclock3D

AMD held a grand spectacle of a keynote at CES 2019, and its headlining announcement was that the Radeon VII will launch on February 7th.

While we would like to see the release of the AMD Radeon VII be as clean cut as that, there’s been plenty of news of shortage and a lack of third-party cards. Industry sources say that there may be fewer than 5,000 units of the Radeon VII at launch. AMD quickly responded to rumors, assuring gamers that there will be enough Radeon VII GPUs to meet demand.

AMD Radeon VII

AMD Radeon VII price

The AMD Radeon VII will launch at a starting price of $ 699 (about £550, AU$ 980). That’s quite a bit more expensive than AMD’s current flagship GPU, the Radeon Vega 64, that originally launched at a $ 499 or £549 (about AU$ 630) price. 

That said, AMD considers the Radeon VII to be a direct competitor to the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080, which costs between as little as $ 699 (£649, AU$ 1,119) or up to $ 799 (£749, AU$ 1,299) with the Founders Edition.

One silver lining to the Radeon VII’s high price is the card will come bundled with free vouchers for Devil May Cry V, Resident Evil 2 and The Division 2 – all three games, not just one.

AMD Radeon VII

AMD Radeon VII specs

The Radeon VII will be the first graphics card to be built on AMD’s – or anyone’s, really – 7nm architecture. Comparatively, the Nvidia’s Turing architecture just managed to hit 12nm, though there are rumors that Team Green may employ Samsung’s fabrication resources to make 7nm chips of its own.

According to AMD, its new 7nm process allows this GPU to increase performance by 25% overall over last year’s model with having to draw any more power. In fact, the Radeon VII may feature the same 295-watt thermal design power (TDP) as its predecessors.

As we previously mentioned, this GPU touts twice as much video memory as the previous model at a whopping 16GB of HBM2 VRAM. The Radeon VII also features 3,840 GCN cores and a maximum boost clock of 1,800MHz – about 300MHz faster than the Vega 64. This maximum frequency also matches up with Nvidia’s Founders Edition factory overclock applied to the GeForce RTX 2080.

Although the Radeon VII doesn’t feature any dedicated ray tracing cores, AMD has told and shown us that it will be able to handle ray tracing production work even better than Nvidia’s RTX 20-series cards. AMD also plans to support DirectML as an alternative to Nvidia’s Tensor Core and AI-driven DLSS anti-aliasing technology.

After AMD announced Ryzen 3rd generation processors will be the first to support PCIe 4.0, you might be wondering if the Radeon VII will feature the same technology. Sadly, we’re here to tell you it won’t and it will be sticking to the same tried and true PCIe 3.0 connector. PCIe 4.0 technology will be first used in conjunction with SSDs to unlock even faster data transfer speeds.

The last bit of bad news we have to bare is that AMD told us that it currently has no plans to introduce CrossFire support on the Radeon VII. We can hardly blame AMD for not including it, as we can imagine it would be murder to get 32GB or more of video memory to work together nicely.

  • AMD next graphics architecture is expected to be Navi


TechRadar: Cameras and camcorder reviews

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Weekly Photography Challenge – Chaos

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Chaos appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week’s photography challenge topic is CHAOS!

Photo: Kimson Doan

Your photos can include anything that evokes a feeling of chaos. It can be busy, messy, crowded, or without order. Or alternatively, it can look chaotic but still have beauty and order in a weird way. Interiors, exteriors, people, wildlife, objects etc. Have fun, and I look forward to seeing what you come up with!

Some Inst-piration from some Instagrammers:

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by BCPA (@thebcpa) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Marieke (@mriek89) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Maria João Silva (@mjayish) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Christian Schoenig (@bigmetaltrout) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Geanne (@ge_an_ne) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by buildingswow (@buildingswow) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by JT (@thomasjason101) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Truc (@trucle157) on

 

Check out some of the articles below that give you tips on this week’s challenge.

Tips for Shooting CHAOS

Tips for Getting Started in Street Photography

4 Tips to Help People Photographers Shoot Interior Spaces

Tips for Doing City Photography from Above

10 Amazing Photography Tricks You Can do at Home with Everyday Objects

A Guide to Photographing Birds and Wildlife in a Wetland Area

21 Images of Birds of Feather Flocking Together

 

Weekly Photography Challenge – CHAOS

Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge.

 

Share in the dPS Facebook Group

You can also share your images in the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well.

If you tag your photos on Flickr, Instagram, Twitter or other sites – tag them as #DPSCHAOS to help others find them. Linking back to this page might also help others know what you’re doing so that they can share in the fun.

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Chaos appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.


Digital Photography School

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AMD Radeon VII release date, news and features

The whole computing world has been waiting with bated breath for AMD’s high-end graphics card – and it’s finally here. Although it’s not the Vega II launch that seemed all but certain, the Radeon VII looks like a stunner that may even beat the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080.

Featuring a whopping 16GB of video memory and a high boost clock of 1,800MHz, this looks like a very exciting graphics card from Team Red. Hang with us for a bit as we tell you everything you need to know about the AMD Radeon VII.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? AMD’s latest high-end graphics card
  • When is it out? February 7, 2019 
  • What will it cost? $ 699 (about £550, AU$ 980)

AMD Radeon VII

AMD Radeon VII release date

While we don’t report on production numbers externally,” the statement reads, “we will have products available via AIB partners and AMD.com at launch of Feb. 7, and we expect Radeon VII supply to meet demand from gamers.

AMD to Overclock3D

AMD held a grand spectacle of a keynote at CES 2019, and its headlining announcement was that the Radeon VII will launch on February 7th.

While we would like to see the release of the AMD Radeon VII be as clean cut as that, there’s been plenty of news of shortage and a lack of third-party cards. Industry sources say that there may be fewer than 5,000 units of the Radeon VII at launch. AMD quickly responded to rumors, assuring gamers that there will be enough Radeon VII GPUs to meet demand.

AMD Radeon VII

AMD Radeon VII price

The AMD Radeon VII will launch at a starting price of $ 699 (about £550, AU$ 980). That’s quite a bit more expensive than AMD’s current flagship GPU, the Radeon Vega 64, that originally launched at a $ 499 or £549 (about AU$ 630) price. 

That said, AMD considers the Radeon VII to be a direct competitor to the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080, which costs between as little as $ 699 (£649, AU$ 1,119) or up to $ 799 (£749, AU$ 1,299) with the Founders Edition.

One silver lining to the Radeon VII’s high price is the card will come bundled with free vouchers for Devil May Cry V, Resident Evil 2 and The Division 2 – all three games, not just one.

AMD Radeon VII

AMD Radeon VII specs

The Radeon VII will be the first graphics card to be built on AMD’s – or anyone’s, really – 7nm architecture. Comparatively, the Nvidia’s Turing architecture just managed to hit 12nm, though there are rumors that Team Green may employ Samsung’s fabrication resources to make 7nm chips of its own.

According to AMD, its new 7nm process allows this GPU to increase performance by 25% overall over last year’s model with having to draw any more power. In fact, the Radeon VII may feature the same 295-watt thermal design power (TDP) as its predecessors.

As we previously mentioned, this GPU touts twice as much video memory as the previous model at a whopping 16GB of HBM2 VRAM. The Radeon VII also features 3,840 GCN cores and a maximum boost clock of 1,800MHz – about 300MHz faster than the Vega 64. This maximum frequency also matches up with Nvidia’s Founders Edition factory overclock applied to the GeForce RTX 2080.

Although the Radeon VII doesn’t feature any dedicated ray tracing cores, AMD has told and shown us that it will be able to handle ray tracing production work even better than Nvidia’s RTX 20-series cards. AMD also plans to support DirectML as an alternative to Nvidia’s Tensor Core and AI-driven DLSS anti-aliasing technology.

After AMD announced Ryzen 3rd generation processors will be the first to support PCIe 4.0, you might be wondering if the Radeon VII will feature the same technology. Sadly, we’re here to tell you it won’t and it will be sticking to the same tried and true PCIe 3.0 connector. PCIe 4.0 technology will be first used in conjunction with SSDs to unlock even faster data transfer speeds.

The last bit of bad news we have to bare is that AMD told us that it currently has no plans to introduce CrossFire support on the Radeon VII. We can hardly blame AMD for not including it, as we can imagine it would be murder to get 32GB or more of video memory to work together nicely.

  • AMD next graphics architecture is expected to be Navi


TechRadar: Photography & video capture news

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Easy to Create Fake Underwater Photography Hack [video]

The post Easy to Create Fake Underwater Photography Hack appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

In this handy tutorial by Raj K Photo, you’ll learn to take impressive underwater-style photos without the need to get underwater! And, even better, this DIY hack costs less than 50pounds.

What you will need:

  • Clear Acrylic Sheet
  • Wood
  • Woodscrews
  • Duct Tape
  • Multi-Purpose Sealant

You can make it to whatever size you want.

What to do:

  1. Cut wood to size.
  2. Screw in the ends but be sure to drill some holes first to stop the wood splitting.
  3. Draw an outline of the frame onto the acrylic.
  4. Place the acrylic onto the top of the wood frame, lining the outline you just drew up with the frame. It acts as a guide so you know where to put the screws.
  5. Use a drill bit to make pilot holes in the acrylic along each side. Use around 6 screws, evenly placed apart. Screw the screws in but be sure not to screw too quickly or hard so as to not split your acrylic.
  6. Flip the frame over and peel off the protective film.
  7. Take your sealant and seal all the gaps between your wood and the acrylic surface.
  8. Leave to dry for 24hrs.
  9. As a further layer of protection, add duct tape around the sealed areas.
  10. Remove any remaining protective film and clean surface.

Photographing your model using your new underwater hack

  1. Find a place to prop it up so that you can lay it face down with water inside. Ensure that it is secure.
  2. Lay your model underneath.
  3. Set an LED light above so that it is shining through the water onto your model. That way you can get an idea of how the shot will look.
  4. Place the flash units (one with a blue gel to look like water) in position above the model.
  5. use a reflector to bounce some light back to your model.
  6. Wet your model’s hair and have the model keep their head slightly off the background to make it look like it is floating.
  7. Take your photos!

You may also find the following articles useful:

5 Tips for Underwater Photography Without Spending a Fortune

5 Tips for Underwater Photography with a GoPro

Surreal Underwater Shipwreck Photo Shoot

Introduction to Taking Great Underwater Photos

The post Easy to Create Fake Underwater Photography Hack appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.


Digital Photography School

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Reminder: Super Blood Moon in North/South America This Weekend

On the evening of January 20 (Sunday night), North/South America, Greenland and Iceland will be treated to a total lunar eclipse – or blood moon – with the full moon at perigee (supermoon).
 
At this point, the full moon will appear about 14% larger and 30% brighter than when it is at its farthest distance from earth (full moon at apogee, a.k.a. micromoon). Want more information and tips for photographing a lunar eclipse? B&H has you covered.
 
Here are the details for a couple of cities on the east coast and west coast (from timeanddate.com):
 

New York City, New York, USA
Duration: 5 hours, 11 minutes, 33 seconds
Duration of totality: 1 hour, 1 minute, 58 seconds
Penumbral begins: Jan 20, 2019 at 9:36:29 pm
Partial begins: Jan 20, 2019 at 10:33:54 pm
Full begins: Jan 20, 2019 at 11:41:17 pm
Maximum: Jan 21, 2019 at 12:12:14 am
Full ends: Jan 21, 2019 at 12:43:15 am
Partial ends: Jan 21, 2019 at 1:50:39 am
Penumbral ends: Jan 21, 2019 at 2:48:02 am

San Francisco, California, USA
Duration: 5 hours, 11 minutes, 33 seconds
Duration of totality: 1 hour, 1 minute, 58 seconds
Penumbral begins: Jan 20, 2019 at 6:36:29 pm
Partial begins: Jan 20, 2019 at 7:33:54 pm
Full begins: Jan 20, 2019 at 8:41:17 pm
Maximum: Jan 20, 2019 at 9:12:14 pm
Full ends: Jan 20, 2019 at 9:43:15 pm
Partial ends: Jan 20, 2019 at 10:50:39 pm
Penumbral ends: Jan 20, 2019 at 11:48:02 pm

Canon, Nikon and Sony News, Deals and What’s New at The-Digital-Picture.com

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Netflix hits 139 million subs, but fears YouTube and Fortnite

If you get the feeling that everyone you know has a Netflix subscription, there’s a good chance you’re right – Netflix just announced that it has 139 million paying subscribers around the world. 

That number doesn’t take into consideration all the folks who use Netflix either through a shared account or are on a free trial account – which likely explains why that number isn’t even higher – but that means there are more people paying for Netflix than there are people living in Tokyo, Delhi, Shanghai, Sao Paulo and Mumbai, combined.

Netflix’s latest report to shareholders, which is where that data originates, claims the company has gained nearly 9 million of these paying subscribers in the last three months of 2018 – closing out the year with 29 million more paying subscribers than it started with.

If analysts’ predictions are right, that would put Netflix on par with the number of Amazon Prime subscribers worldwide (around 100 million at last count), and vastly ahead of the largest streaming music service, Spotify, which is sitting somewhere around 40 million paying subscribers. 

 Will Disney cause Netflix some dismay? 

In an earnings call that accompanied the report, Netflix’s executive team claimed that the streaming service owns around 10% of the 1 billion hours Americans spend watching TV per day, a number that they say also includes live cable television and video games as well.

To that end, it’s not other streaming services like Disney+ or DC Universe that pose a threat to the company – it’s actually Fortnite and YouTube that the company fears the most: “We compete with (and lose to) Fortnite more than HBO,” Netflix said in its earnings report. “When YouTube went down globally for a few minutes in October, our viewing and signups spiked for that time.”

So what’s Netflix doing with all this money from the new signups? It’s putting a good chunk of it back into its original programming. In 2019, Netflix will be launching new seasons of The Crown, 13 Reasons Why and the third season of Stranger Things, in addition to other undisclosed projects.

Does that mean we're in for more creative ventures like Black Mirror: Bandersnatch? You can bet your monthly subscription fee on it.

Source: Netflix


TechRadar: Photography & video capture news

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Netflix hits 139 million subs, but fears YouTube and Fortnite

If you get the feeling that everyone you know has a Netflix subscription, there’s a good chance you’re right – Netflix just announced that it has 139 million paying subscribers around the world. 

That number doesn’t take into consideration all the folks who use Netflix either through a shared account or are on a free trial account – which likely explains why that number isn’t even higher – but that means there are more people paying for Netflix than there are people living in Tokyo, Delhi, Shanghai, Sao Paulo and Mumbai, combined.

Netflix’s latest report to shareholders, which is where that data originates, claims the company has gained nearly 9 million of these paying subscribers in the last three months of 2018 – closing out the year with 29 million more paying subscribers than it started with.

If analysts’ predictions are right, that would put Netflix on par with the number of Amazon Prime subscribers worldwide (around 100 million at last count), and vastly ahead of the largest streaming music service, Spotify, which is sitting somewhere around 40 million paying subscribers. 

 Will Disney cause Netflix some dismay? 

In an earnings call that accompanied the report, Netflix’s executive team claimed that the streaming service owns around 10% of the 1 billion hours Americans spend watching TV per day, a number that they say also includes live cable television and video games as well.

To that end, it’s not other streaming services like Disney+ or DC Universe that pose a threat to the company – it’s actually Fortnite and YouTube that the company fears the most: “We compete with (and lose to) Fortnite more than HBO,” Netflix said in its earnings report. “When YouTube went down globally for a few minutes in October, our viewing and signups spiked for that time.”

So what’s Netflix doing with all this money from the new signups? It’s putting a good chunk of it back into its original programming. In 2019, Netflix will be launching new seasons of The Crown, 13 Reasons Why and the third season of Stranger Things, in addition to other undisclosed projects.

Does that mean we're in for more creative ventures like Black Mirror: Bandersnatch? You can bet your monthly subscription fee on it.

Source: Netflix


TechRadar: Cameras and camcorder reviews

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Night Photography Tips and Tricks

Night photos can be some of the most dramatic photographs that you’ll ever shoot. City lights can create a beautiful look, with the correct aperture setting. Shooting photos of fireworks is fun, but needs a long shutter opening. Capturing photos of your friends during a nighttime party requires a good flash unit. Shooting those night photos can be a challenge, but having the right equipment and knowing the correct techniques certainly helps. Try these tips to improve your night photography results.

night photography tips tricks

Photo by Jacob Surland; ISO 800, f/22.0, 1/25-second exposure.

Use a tripod to make sure you don’t have any problems with blurry photos from camera shake. Shooting photos at night requires a slower shutter speed, which can lead to blurry photos.

• If you don’t have a tripod, you can try a few tricks for keeping the camera steady. First, set the camera on a steady surface, such as a table or the top of a wall, and consider using the camera’s self-timer or remote shutter. Second, lean your body weight against a building or door frame, holding your elbows in tightly to your body while shooting, thereby steadying yourself. Third, if you think your shot has plenty of external light, you can manually increase the shutter speed, and, hopefully, the photo’s exposure will be OK.

Try shooting around some water. At night, the water will appear black, but the reflection of the lights, moon, and other bright objects off the water create beautiful effects.

• Bring external lighting with you. If you’re trying to shoot a photo of people at night, you’ll need a powerful light or flash to provide enough light to illuminate the subjects. Some photographers even try to use directional light, such as a powerful flashlight, to create an artistic look in the photos.

Try several different camera settings with a single subject, just to ensure a properly exposed shot, especially if you’re learning to shoot at night. With a point and shoot, fully automatic camera, try a few different scene modes to figure out which one will work best. Shooting at night can be easier with a camera with manual control features, though.

Try a lot of angles when shooting at night. With the night sky in the background, shooting upward can create some interesting looks, for example.

Use blurred subjects and motion to your advantage by focusing on an object that cannot move. As people or vehicles move around the object, they will look slightly blurred in the final image, with the longer shutter speeds required most of the time at night. This type of look can be interesting and different from other photos.

About the Author:
Steve Schuldt is the president of United Camera, one of the nation’s largest repair centers for cameras, camcorders, gaming consoles, and Apple products.

Go to full article: Night Photography Tips and Tricks

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The post Night Photography Tips and Tricks appeared first on PictureCorrect.

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Wedding Photography Tips

1

Once Upon a Time…

Wedding Photography - Male groom kissing hand of female bride

Capture emotions and tell the story to make magical moments last a lifetime. Ultimately as a photographer you need to be observant and present but also inconspicuous. Couples shouldn’t be asked to repeat poses, so be ready to capture small moments showing affection. This wedding photography image shows a groom kissing his brides hand; the large aperture (shallow Depth of Field) of f/5.6 keeps the emphasis on the groom and the hand, but still shows off the bride’s bright smile. For multiple wedding shots use continuous shooting mode and hold down the shutter button as long as you’d like.

2

Grab the Opportunity

Wedding Photograp of a Bride and groom leaving church with motion blur effect

There will be hundreds of special moments on the wedding day that you as the photographer must notice and capture. Certain events, such as the vows and walking down the aisle cannot be repeated, so give yourself a good position in the venue to begin with, but also keep out of the way. A nice effect is to use the slow sync flash mode, so you capture the blur of the couple walking, but the center of the frame stays sharp because the flash freezes it. Turn the mode dial to TV or S (Shutter Priority) mode and use a slow shutter speed of 1/4th of a second. Use either the on-camera flash or a separate one for more power. When you use slow sync, the shutter remains open much longer to allow in more light for your exposure.

3

Take Unusual Wedding Photos

Bride and groom on the wedding day

There will always be time for the formal posed wedding photos with all the friends and family members. The fun, casual moments are sporadic and less predictable. Look out for tender moments where the couple shares a story or a joke. You might capture outright affection or a glancing look they share. Use flash to freeze the moment and a small aperture of f/14 upwards to keep things sharp. Remember to keep the shutter speed at 1/250th of a second and higher as you don’t want to risk any blur. You can also consider using a warming filter, known as the 81A. This has a slight peach tone, but makes the skin glow and look alive.

4

Capture them Leaving

Wedding Picture of a Bride and groom walking out the churchdoor

The classic wedding photograph is the couple leaving the marriage venue, when the guests throw rice or confetti at the couple. Generally this will be in the day time with plenty of light, so choose a large aperture (f/2.8-f/5.6) to keep the couple in focus and the background slightly blurred. Use a shutter speed of 1/125th of a second so you can see some of the confetti in the air. Use flash if you want to guarantee that the image will be sharp. Consider using the continuous shooting mode, so you have a series of shots of the couple leaving while confetti is thrown at them.

5

Tell the Fairy Tail

A silhouette photograph of a bride and groom kissing

When it comes to the formal wedding shots, although most people will want the standard family line up images, remember to be creative. Take your bride and groom away from the commotion and place them indoors by a big window or where there is a sliver of light. The idea is to catch their silhouette, so you need the light source to be behind them. Get the couple to kiss, making sure you include the back of the brides dress and veil for the outline. Remember to turn off the flash and use either spot or multi-zone metering mode. Take a reading of just the bright area and then point your camera at them and shoot! Ideally you should use a tripod for this shot, although handholding at 1/160s should keep things reasonably sharp.

6

Capture the Fun

Senior Couples Dancing Together At Wedding Reception

Photograph some of the older folks out on the dance floor, or the bridesmaid catching the bouquet thrown by the bride. A wedding is a once in a lifetime event for the couple, and your chance to show off your prowess at photography, so make the best use of this opportunity. The happy couple will thank you for it in the years to come.

S

Recommended Settings

It should go without saying, but it’s important to make sure your images are sharp and focused when taking wedding photographs. These images cannot be repeated. Although you can use a tripod for the formal shots, you will need to handhold a lot of indoor, candid photographs so use a flash, wide aperture and high shutter speed if necessary. Use flash if the conditions indoors seem a bit dark, and use it outside on sunny days to light the subject’s faces. Keep the ISO as low as you can, around 100, because wedding photographs are usually later enlarged and a lower ISO gives a finer grain.

E

Recommended Equipment

When photographing a wedding, always take a spare camera body. Murphy’s Law states that if it can go wrong, it will, so bring a spare camera body in case of any problems. Better yet is having two camera bodies with a different lens on each. For example, a telephoto zoom on one, and a wide-angle lens on the other allow you to quickly switch between the two. Always take extra batteries and use a tripod for formal shots. Separate flash units are more powerful than built-in flashes, so have some of these. You might take some large gold and silver reflectors to add warmth and light to the subject’s faces.

C

Conclusion

A wedding is supposed to be a once in a lifetime event for the couple, and as a photographer, there is a lot of pressure on your shoulders. You need to be present at all times yet keep out of the way. You need to be creative but formal at the same time. Many photographers will photograph a wedding as an assistant at first before taking on the task on their own since it is a big responsibility. If you are a lead photographer, take some assistants with you so that everything is covered. Remember that these photographs will be cherished for life, so you absolutely must do the best job that you can.

The post Wedding Photography Tips appeared first on ExposureGuide.com.


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Lessons from the Masters: Morley Baer

The post Lessons from the Masters: Morley Baer appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Adam Welch.

Portrait of Morley Baer

Each time I find myself cruising down Highway 1 in California between Big Sur and San Francisco, the urge to make photographs instantly strikes me. It’s an easy feeling to encounter. The rocky beaches and rolling hills tend to beg for a lens. Accompanying this sense of photographic wanderlust is a recognition of walking in the footsteps of some of the greatest American photographers that the twentieth century ever produced. Names like Weston, Adams, and Cunningham all seem to linger in this area of the country. However, there’s another name connected to the deep photographic past of the west coast that you might not know quite so well but should: Morley Baer. In this installment of “Lessons from the Masters,” we’re going to take a closer look at the prolific work of Morley Baer and learn some valuable lessons about how he went about the business of photography that you can use to improve your images.

Morley Baer

Morley Baer came into this world on April 5th, 1916 in Toledo, Ohio. After graduating from the University of Michigan with a BA in English and an MA in Theatre Arts, he briefly worked in advertising in Chicago until fate pressed him into his life’s work. After seeing an exhibition of Edward Weston’s work, Baer became captivated by the medium of photography. He left his position with the advertising firm he worked to educate himself in the art of photography. After working in commercial photography briefly, he soon made the journey to Carmel, California to track down Edward Weston.

After serving in the Navy as war photographer from 1941 to 1946, Morley and his now wife Frances (also an artist and photographer) embarked on a decades-long exploration into photography in and around the Bay Area of California until finally settling in their home/studio near Garrapata Beach. Baer became one of the most desirable architectural photographers of his time. His landscape and seascape works are also still widely regarded as some of the finest photographic representations of the west coast of California ever to be recorded on film.

Here are some, but certainly not all, of the lessons you can’t learn from Morley Baer.

Total proficiency with the tools you use

For the main body of his landscape and architectural studies, Baer used one camera and one camera only; the Ansco 8x10S view camera. In our modern day photography jungle, we are constantly harangued by the marketing mentality that if our cameras are not the newest, then they are somehow lacking. Of course, that’s just an opinion.

In any case, Morley was an expert operator of his Ansco to the point when it became almost an appendage and an extension of his physicality. Similar in practice to Ed Weston, the fact that Baer became so monogamous with his singular 8×10 view camera speaks volumes to us today.

Portrait of Morley Baer and his Ansco by David Fullagar

Whatever your camera or tools, make yourself so familiar with their functions that you can control them without hesitation. The adage “the best camera is the one you have with you” is not enough. We must strive to become absolute masters of the tools we use to make our photographs. The tool is secondary to the ability of the user. No matter what gear you happen to be using it is essential that you understand how to use it and use it well.

Find what works best for you

Not only was Baer’s proficiency of his 8×10 camera finely tuned in, but he was also quite fixed in the way he presented his photographs. Morley was a darkroom master printer, and he virtually always printed his photographs using the contact method and seldom used an enlarger. This meant the negative was exposed directly in contact with the paper resulting in an image the same size as the negative. Contact printing remains one of the most simple and pure forms of printing even today. Regardless of its merits or limitations, this was the vehicle Baer found worked best for him and his creative expression.

By Morley Baer

While we should all continue to learn and grow with our photography, there must also be a conscious recognition of the methods and techniques that tend to produce the best results time and time again. Hone in on the processes that allow you to reach your fullest potential and pay no mind to whether or not they are popular or follow certain “rules.” When it comes to photography the so-called “rules” are there to guide us, not limit our flight.

Healthy competition can help you grow

Every so often I get an email or a Facebook message from someone asking whether or not they should enter a particular photography contest. I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with the idea of grading one photograph against another. This is because I feel it causes us to miss the purpose of photography altogether. At the same time, a photograph is a visual medium, and as photographers possess an inescapably inherent narcissism; we want our work seen by others.

By Adam Welch

I mentioned earlier that Baer’s wife, Frances, was also a camera jockey. Not only did she make photographs herself, but she was also remarkably accomplished in her own right to the point where Morley and Frances were essentially domestic competitors with their photography. There is a famous tale of them reaching an agreement for rights to photograph scenes when they were on road trips. The agreement they reached thereby declared that everything on the left side of the road belonged to the driver while everything on the right belonged to the passenger.

It’s important for us to reach a certain level of catharsis with our photography so that we produce work that is representative of our vision. At the same time, healthy (and I do stress the “healthy” part) competition with other photographers not only keeps our creative juices flowing but also serves to engage us with our fellow shooters. We learn and better ourselves through interaction with the work we love and respect. With the correct perspective, competition with our peers promotes dynamic artistic growth.

Parting words on Morley Baer

As with all esteemed photographers, seeing the work in person brings about a level of appreciation that cannot be obtained by merely viewing a photograph on a computer screen. I’ve recently been fortunate enough to visit select galleries in and around the areas where Morley Baer lived and operated. As usual, it’s easy to look and see the beauty of Baer’s photographs, but as perpetual students of photography, we should always seek to find what we can learn from those whose work we admire.

The lessons listed here are just a few to glean from Morley. Digest them and put them into practice with your own work. However, don’t stop there. Learn all you can, when you can and where you can. Never stop exploring the incredible world of photography.

 

You may also find the following articles interesting:

Lessons you can learn from master photographers – Minor White, Ansel Adams, and Syl Arena

More Lessons from the Masters of Photography: Edward Weston

Lessons from the Masters: Robert Capa and Jerry Uelsmann

More Lessons from the Photography Masters: David Burnett and Vivian Maier

Cartier-Bresson and Stieglitz – Study the Masters of Photography to Become a Better Photographer

Masters of Photography: Bruce Davidson, Master of the Subway

The post Lessons from the Masters: Morley Baer appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Adam Welch.


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The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is reportedly in the works

We’ve heard plenty of rumors that Nvidia plans to announce a new GTX 11-series of graphics cards, but this is the first time we’re hearing about GeForce GTX 1660 Ti.

Apparently, such an oddly-named card is indeed in the works and it’ll feature a TU116 GPU with 1,536 CUDA cores and 6GB of GDDR6, according to three sources that spoke with Videocardz. This GTX 1660 Ti is also said not include any RTX cores – there’s no word on whether Tensor Cores have been cut as well – as a costcutting measure for users who don’t want to spend the premium on raytraced graphics.

Around the launch of the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060, there was heated speculation that a Geforce GTX 1160 card would also be announced, so there suddenly being this rumored GTX 1660 seems a bit odd. We’re also taken aback by how few CUDA cores it has compared to the 1,920 count found on the Nvidia RTX 2060, but it would still technically be an upgrade over the Nvidia GTX 1060 and its 1,280 CUDA Cores

Although this rumor seems to be standing on shaky ground, it seems certain that Nvidia will have to announce more affordable graphics cards to replace its outgoing 10-series Pascal graphics cards. Whether it takes shape in a RTX-less 11- or 16-series or the hotly anticipated RTX 2050 (Ti) remains to be seen.

  • Meanwhile in processor land, the AMD's first Ryzen 3000 chip look very exciting

Via Wccftech


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